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's not without the controversy, but the budget cuts that are from educators to parents about the morality of corporate advertising in schools is certainly causing a stir. yet, filling the financial shortfall is the biggest prem fa prem-- problem facing schools today. and he needs funding. >> american public education is in financial crisis. >> he heads up education funding partners, a colorado firm that matches it with schools looking for cash. >> they want the right partners and the right controls, our model gives them that control. >> over the years more schools have been turning to corporate sponsors for much needed revenue. they struck a deal with staples in exchange for ads on the district's website and a supply list containing a coupon and kids got to attend the science enrichment program. >> it's really about selling anything, it's about allowing companies to come in and partner for a good cause and public education in responsible ways. >> there are aggressive campaigns out there buses and playing fields becoming common. for some districts it's what keep the doors open. critics arg
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fiscal year 2014 budget and democratic alternatives that work. i first want to thank my colleague, mr. ho
an index fund. they have to educate for themselves. >> that's an interesting point. most people would think the opposite. putting my money in a bank is not risky. an index fund is risky. comes down to people's fear. worried about the market. the market is volatile and it's risky. what do you do when people tell you that? >> it's the thing about fear and ignorance allowing us to dictate financial decisions. we should never allow that. we should never be scared of something you don't know about. a lot of individuals are scared of something because they have not put pun in the market. what other alternatives do you have? show me another that can give you a 13.2% return. you show me another that can give that type of return or security. what we have to do, this is what lewis has been doing for years, directly addressing and making sure you know there are other alternatives such as exchange traded funds. for $150 a share you can buy the entire s&p 500. >> all you need is a trading account to get in. this gives you exposure. >> again, you don't trust because it's high risk. there's ways to mitiga
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
, but not exclusively in those cities. we really are looking for some of the best practices in education and workforce development, in integration of diverse populations and affordability and quality of life issues in cities and regions and also -- and sustainability, in which encompasses a broad range of things. it's primarily environmental sustainability. the overarching theme which i think is particularly pertinent here in the bay area is regional governance and cooperation where we try to emphasize move each of our cities that they really need to figure out in their broader economic region, not just within their city limits. so how do you coordinate with the communities around you to advance some of these policy issues, whether it's transportation, environmental improvements, economic development, education systems, workforce training, etc. these are some of the issues that we really want to publicize the best practices so that practitioners such as ourselves can bring these ideas back home and really move an issue forward. i think here in the bay area, bringing this group of four european experts
. you have a big responsibility because of the events and because of the educational program, you invite people to take the bicycle on the street on a regular day, you have a big risk because your infrastructure is not yet there. so that was part of the political debate. still, i am willing to defend that policy that organizing events, this is in front of a mayor bank in the heart of brussels where the employees have been invited to come to work not by a car and to have a taste, as it says, of another mobility. it is part of the european car-free day which is organized every year, september 22, i believe it's similar to what you have in may, bike to work event. i really think those are good references. people maybe only have one day but a good experience of an alternative way to travel. i have been showing just one hour go, to go, the guidelines in english, it's our regional administration. they're very proud of it. i took one copy and showed it to some of you just this morning. it's really giving guidelines to our locate authorities on how to have the infrastructure done in a proper way
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would also like to thank the production manager who is behind-the-scenes somewhere. he's waving. our production manager consistently provide patient and reliable technical support which is beyond value when lecturing to large audiences like those of you gathered today. without further a do, i'm honored to share with you today paintings that comprise the exhibition here at the museum. girl with a pearl earring, from january 26-june 2nd the museum will be the first venue in the american tour of paintings from the royal picture gallery which is located in haik. how many have individual painting in the normal home? a good number of you. this unique museum is often called the jouleewelry box. it has the world's most prestigious paintings from the morris house which to
their children exposed to witchcraft and sex education, both taught in schools. >> they were encouraged to ask the devil to help. >> we found out what is in the textbooks. exactly the opposite of what the bible tells us and teaches us. illegal in germany. persecuted, fines, jail or loss of their children. most home schoolers are left alone by the government. against home schooling. in those nations where it is illegal, home schoolers risk losing their children. two of the worst nations are germany and sweden. if you would like to see what it would be like if it was banned in america if it was banned, come to sweden. this family had to take their family to finland in exile. >> we were forced out of our country. that make as stronger impact than i can imagine. this is our country. now we are pushed away from it. >> sweden is the toughest places to home school. michael donnelly of the home school administration. president of the nordic committee for human rights calls it a dictatorship where social workers tell parents what to do. >> they claim to be a democracy, far from it. it is a dictatorship
the crac, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how seriouous is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're really at the peak of their financial succs. they're making the most they e
a better education than you. and in fact, the reverse is happening. women entering the work force are often better educated, with more academic and trade certifications than men who are doing it. and women are also doing hard and dangerous jobs. we can look to what they do in the military. they can look at how we see them as firefighters and police officers and prison guards. under the legislative i am proposing, no longer will women be on their own and fighting for equal pay or for equal work. in this country, we say work hard and play by the rules, you'll get ahead. we work hard every day but we find that the rules are different for women and for men. actually, the rules in many workplaces are rigged against us. so, mr. president, i would hope that we would pass my amendment today that would allow us to be able to go forward later on in the year and pass paycheck fairness. it is important to the women in the workplace and it's important to our economy. much is being said here about being pro growth. who isn't pro growth? of course we want to grow our economy. and if we look at the tax str
's for cancer or paving roads or education or any other worthy project, there's going to be less money if we don't address the spending problem. particularly if we don't address mandatory spending. and i ask them: have you looked to do what every family has had to do, what every business has had to do during this four years of tepid growth and coming out of this recession, which just seems to linger and linger and linger. 23 million people out of work. have you looked at ways in which you can make your spending and your administration of the budget which you oversee, can you make that more efficient and more effective? are there things you can cut? are there programs you can eliminate that no longer are effective or perhaps shouldn't have been there in the first place? are there things that you would like to do but without the resources, you're not able to do at this time, so you have to set them aside? so if the family is faced with lower revenue or dad is, his job, his salary has been cut or mom has lost her second job or for whatever reason they're having a hard time making payments -- educat
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
in the workplace. your reaction? > > my reaction is that these are very privileged women, highly educated, with many opportunities. i do not believe that they are an expression of women today. most people say, in terms of marissa mayer, that, if you want productivity, you let people work from home because they have more time, more energy and more flexibility; and if you want innovation, then you bring them all together. and i think a combination of those two things is the best way to support an institution, a culture, and a business. on the other hand, i am very concerned about it. i think the issue is that women are empowered. we do not- > sandberg you are talking about? > > yes. we do not get our power from men, we do not get our power from others, we do not have to accommodate or manipulate to become empowered. we do have the education, we have the experience, we have the knowledge, and we are empowered. so i believe that i am in opposition to the position of both of those two women. > let me ask you about sexism. there is blatant sexism in countries such as india or afghanistan- > > a
. >> the teachers do not teach in class. cannot pay,children so they don't learn in class. the education is like wasted time. >> this person does not work for any international organization. he is one of the many individuals who provide services to local communities. he made the decision 12 years ago. he thought he had a well-paid job in the oil industry. when he became infected with hiv and his wife died of aids, his life was turned upside down. today, the children are getting a special lesson. two women from switzerland are staying in the guest house. they have agreed to spend time with the children. and -- them is a primary school teacher. it is a chance for the youngsters to learn some english. >> i like blue. >> the school has benefited from the political changes in myanmar. until recently, they have only offer the occasional weekend class. private schools were outlawed under the military regime, but that ban has been overturned. now they want to open a proper school at a regular timetable. the building is well under way. forill have enough space 300 pupils. he is impatient about getting bu
with our financial ostentations to educate consumers about the new value proposition that this will bring. though idea is to make shopping easier. fully convergent, both for remote transactions and processing transactions. tracy: what does this mean in the terms that we may buy a loaf of bread at the grocery store. >> our vision is that with your phone you will be doing a tap and pay at a physical location and when you will want to make a payment over your phone you well not have to enter your 16 digit number but you simply have to enter a log and password. tracy: what about security? that is a number one concern for consumers. the mastercard brand, do you think, give you an advantage or a level of assurance that some of these other companies cannot provide. >> very much so. as a consumer you have all the benefits the you enjoy today. and we're going to introduce a security features in this digital devices. tracy: and the last thing, some of your competitors, visa and discover have recently said they will not charge any sort of fee on digital wallets, companies like paypall and even ebay
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
government at home and abroad. >> rand paul wants to accomplish the departments of education and congress and epa. >> small detail. >> and the federal reserve and abolish the income tax. the second amendment which does not allow in his opinion for any form of gun control whatsoever. he makes mitt romney look looks michael due dukakis. >> i paint in primary colors. >> these are details. >> they are details i would just as soon ignore. on some of those fronts. but, again, overall, the primary message that he delivers is less government at home and restraint abroad which you know what? the republican party has been reckless over the past decade. we have paid a lot for it with our philosophy. and so i think he's a good symbol like his father. listen. i voted for his father in the republican primary in 2012. did i agree with what he said about 9/11? >> god, i hope not. >> absolutely not. there are a lot of things that rand paul said i think are way out there and i disagree with, but the core issue of small government at home and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic se
for a fun and educational experience. since 1938 the derby has inspired thousands of the region's young people to learn the physics behind gravity racing and the engineering used to design soapbox racers. america's soapbox derby has been called the greatest amateur racing event in the world. and on june 15 it will continue to make history. the derby teaches sportsmanship, hard work and pride of accomplishment and it imbues its young participants with that same spirit of innovation that has long fueled america's greatness. young people who participate in these derbies are often sponsored by community groups, police departments, fire departments and others who want to invest in our country's future and a very direct and meaningful way -- in a very direct and meaningful way. every year i am incredibly proud of my constituents from maryland's fifth district who participate. a number of soapbox derby champions have come from the fifth district, including the 2009 s of the 2007, 2008, and last year. the winners in 2007 and 2008, kasey rader and courtney rail, respectively went on to win the
on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much the way all our conversations went. it is not thinking i would be getting christmas cards or anything else from him. i was not as a retired part of it is that got the strong impression when i would run into him that he viewed me as evil because of the gun issue. he had very strong opinions on the. [inaudible] [laughter] i'd found something on the gun issue he disagreed very strongly about and he viewed me as e
were widely denied an education. now, more than eight million students attend afghan schools and more than 40% of them are female. in 2001 afghanistan had 20,000 teachers, all male. today there are 200,000 teachers including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. per capita gdp has grown fourfold since 2001. afghan life expectancy has increased 20 years since then. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access compared to about one million ten years ago. now these facts do not eliminate the difficulties that we face. they continue insurgency, a neighbor, pakistan that remains a safe haven for insurgents moving across the border. an ineffective and often corrupt central government and other major barriers to stability and to progress. just as it is important for us to be realistic about the challenges that we face in afghanistan, it's also important that we recognize the advances that have an bp made. so that we can reinforce actions that promote success. i just mentioned two here. the first is to continue to w
're given opportunities to fully participate and take advantage of higher education opportunities and that's what the issue is here. this is distinct from fisher vs. the university of texas. >> neil: the argument could be in michigan they said we addressed this grieve vances in inequalities and it's not an issue anymore. >> that's exactly right sandra day o'connor, the last case that was herd, she said in 25 years this may not be necessary, but in the states that have passed these laws, michigan being one of eight -- have decided it's not necessary anymore. the laws giving previous rep shall treatment based on race, ethnicity is not necessary. >> is that the state usurping the federal government? >> that's the argue. >> in california the appeals court has upheld this, which is another reason why the supreme court is going to hear it. you have two pel las courts with different decisions. >> you look at the history. seems as if this is -- was an inorganic movement. you had one of the architects, a big supporter of the california proposition that heather is referring to, who came on out and s
a sweep stakes model. smit: a big part is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an innovation conference, so many innovations and payments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the features and benefits getting them to adopt them. that's what pay perks is here for, educate consumers about what products and features are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the valuechain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sherylout now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the v
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
was offered social housing and now determined to improve the situation from the education. he will lose fourteen pounds in the tax and three pounds in council tax leaving 11 pounds per week after utility. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship what advice does he have for jordan? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady, first of all, the government is investing in social housing. she'll hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point, when housing benefit costs 23 billion pounds a year, we have to reform it. there's a basic issue of fairness which is why should someone who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a spare room subsidize when someone in social housing should? there's a basic issue of fairness. that's why it should be put right. >> i might be honorable member for -- i'm very proud of our coalition for sticking to -- [inaudible] >> the honorable lay by's question -- lady's question must be heard. >> we set an example for the world and later on this month the prime minister goes to bali to co-chair the high level panel to discuss
and i sent them to the uk for the quality of education there for a better future and maybe the chance to work. how is this criminal? to have dreams for my children and family and working hard every day. >> now in the meantime, the banks are still closed and there are reports that the two sick banks which should have been able to re-open tomorrow because the emp cb said they would provide liquidity says that they may not open until at least thursday. that would be 12 days with the major banks closed. people are going to the super markets. there may be a food shortage. why was this woman buying so much? she was from russia and she has seen this movie before and she fears shortages. >> you're originally from russia? >> yes, exactly. i have lived through this. uncertainties and yes, i'm worried. >> is that why you think you're doing this today? because you have seen this before? >> yes. i have seen how it develops and how quickly and badly it can develop. >> so the president of this country is supposed to appear any moment. he's usually late and might be worse because there is a meeting t
the polarized the geological lead as we bring to bear. what did we achieve in education or environmentalism or what's not and in that sense, mayors suggests their accessibility to us but ultimately the real question is army is not in vulnerable to influence? our mayors on the side of big money or not? as compared to what? what in the world system? my view is mayors and councilors and citizens of cities are a great place to start because cds around world remain more cosmopolitan and open and tolerant and floral and more creative than the alternative entities at the state and national level. why not make a bet on them? we bet on the nation's state for 400 years and i am not sure in the 20 first century that that is paying off? lana please democratic that on the city for a while lands see what they can do? is worth making that bet. >> turn it over to the audience. listen. i said that when i had the opportunity. when it is on the ballot by a vote for the parliament of mayors. i went on to say some of the things that could not accomplish, would not accomplish, some of the terrible obstacles the
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated. we want to lift people up from poverty, to put the american dream in reached for everybody. our party cannot hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climbed the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children we will champion school choice and solutions to lowering the cost of health care. instead of arithmetic our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. our 80 percent friend is not our 20 percent enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful of those who don't agree with a hundred percent of them. finding common ground with voters will be a top priority. so first, we're going to learn
in education and if they want to get involved, it's completely up to them, students first.org it doing, according to many critics and others, all kinds of interesting work. most importantly, the book -- there's a lady that asked a question. she has two or throw books. the book has received incredible reviews. i you have any stake in education or education means anything to you personally, your kids, your family, the future of the country, they're pointing to many individuals, it's a must-read and i'd strongly recommend. so, in that note, please join in the thanking michelle rhee. [applause] >> up next, after words with guest host jamie weinstein. this week, kim ghattas and her book: the secretary, a journey with hillary clinton from beirut to the heart of american power." she conditions miss clinton's role, and whether u.s. power is in decline. the program is about an hour. >> where we should begin is to talk about your biography. i think as much as this book is about hillary clinton and her time as secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut to covering the secret
. >> solman: a blogger for the chronicle of higher education, potter has argued that older scholars are clogging the pipeline for the younger ones. the number of ph.d's now far outstrips the number of tenured job openings. >> there's a lot of rage out there about being trained for jobs that you can never have. is it worth keeping younger people out, not giving them the chance to have full-time work, to develop themselves, so that older people can hang on to keep everything we love? >> solman: and these days, even younger people aren't always spring chickens. it's been seven years since 38- year-old joe fruscione earned his ph.d in english from george washington university. he has yet to land a full-time job. >> the market for ph.d's in humanities is almost super- saturated. there have been some positions where i've had to compete with hundreds of applicants who all on paper have roughly the same education and skill sets. >> so fruscione works three part-time gigs. one is running a moby dick discussion group at a washington, d.c. bookstore. >> when you hear moby dick, you think... >>
education, we need to make sure we protect medicare and what we've seen and the alternative is they don't do that. that create as voucher program for medicare. >> we certainly agree on the opposition to a recession. senator corker, you going to vote for this budget? >> no, i'm not. i don't expect you think i would. it really doesn't address any of the major issues that we need to be dealing with. there's no entitlement reform. republicans would like to see a 75 year fix for our entitlements so that we'll see, know those will be here down the road. if you want to know the truth, larry, neither budget does the things that need to be done for our country but i will say two nights ago we passed a cr, first time since i've been in the united states senate in six years and to months. i was able to vote for a bill that cut real spending. we'll go through this budget process and the democratic budget obviously as you just mentioned doesn't do what it needs to do. republican budget could do more, maybe there's a remote chance that we have a conference that actually addresses the big issues of the da
? we've solved a problem in our society, how to educate the next generation. and let me tell you, this is an important matter. we economists believe that the single most important factor shaping the future of any economy in the world including the united states is the quality and the quantity of the educated trained labor force it produces. college and universities are where we do that. if we're crippling an entire generation with debts they cannot support and jobs that will not encourage them to continue in their studies we are as a nation shooting ourselves in the foot going forward. it's a demonstration of the dysfunctionality of our system. and then the question comes could we forgive the students' debts? well, it's an interesting idea. but how then do you go to the people who can't afford their credit card debts or their home debts or their mortgage debts -- they're all hurting. and the students have a special claim, i give them that. and we need those students, i understand it. but we have to go at the root of a society which allows unspeakable wealth to accumulate in the h
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